How To Get Rid Of Swollen Knee

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This article was co-authored by Jonathan Frank, MD. Dr. Jonathan Frank is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and joint preservation in Beverly Hills, California. Dr. Frank’s practice focuses on minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery of the knee, shoulder, hip and elbow. Dr. Frank holds an MD from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine. He completed an orthopedic residency at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and a fellowship in orthopedic sports medicine and hip preservation at the Steadman Clinic in Vail, Colorado. He is the team physician for the US Ski and Snowboard Team. Dr. Frank is currently a scientific reviewer for top peer-reviewed scientific journals and his research has been presented at regional, national and international orthopedic conferences and has won numerous awards, including the prestigious Mark Coventry and William A Grana awards.

How To Get Rid Of Swollen Knee

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Should You Use Ice Or Heat To Treat Joint Pain And Swelling?

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The knee may feel swollen due to an injury to the tendons, ligaments, or meniscus. Other medical problems, such as arthritis, can contribute to knee swelling. Even overuse can cause swollen knees.

The swelling can be inside the knee joint or in the surrounding tissue. People call the latter “water to the knee”. After diagnosing a swollen knee, you can try some home remedies. If your knee remains swollen or painful, you should consult a doctor for advice and treatment.

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Do’s And Don’ts After Knee Surgery

This article was co-authored by Jonathan Frank, MD. Dr. Jonathan Frank is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and joint preservation in Beverly Hills, California. Dr. Frank’s practice focuses on minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery of the knee, shoulder, hip and elbow. Dr. Frank holds an MD from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine. He completed an orthopedic residency at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and a fellowship in orthopedic sports medicine and hip preservation at the Steadman Clinic in Vail, Colorado. He is the team physician for the US Ski and Snowboard Team. Dr. Frank is currently a scientific reviewer for top peer-reviewed scientific journals and his research has been presented at regional, national and international orthopedic conferences and has won numerous awards, including the prestigious Mark Coventry and William A Grana awards. This article has been viewed 1,407,619 times.

The content of this article is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis or treatment. You should always contact your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before starting, changing or stopping your treatment.

Before starting treatment for a swollen knee, assess your symptoms and try to find out what is causing the swelling. For example, if you have swelling on the back of your knee, you may have a Baker’s cyst. If you are having trouble moving your knee, it is possible that your knee is injured. No matter what symptoms you have, it’s a good idea to get a diagnosis from your doctor. Depending on what’s causing your swelling, your doctor may recommend different treatments, such as surgery, steroid injections, or physical therapy. If the swelling is related to a problem such as flat feet, orthopedic shoes can help. Scroll down for more tips from our medical contributor, including how to prevent swollen knees! you need some fluid around the knee – it helps cushion the legs and keeps the joint flexible. However, if too much fluid builds up, it can cause an effusion and cause pain, swelling, and stiffness. Fortunately, knowing how to get rid of fluid from the knee can help alleviate this discomfort.

Here’s everything you need to know about fluid on the knee, including why it happens and how to remove fluid from the knee.

Baker’s Cyst (popliteal Cyst)

According to the Cleveland Clinic, a knee effusion occurs when the joint swells with fluid. This can cause symptoms such as:

There are several reasons why fluid can form in the knee. According to the Cleveland Clinic, the most common causes are:

Well, it depends on the cause of the effusion. For example, according to the Cleveland Clinic, sometimes all you need to do is rest, warm up, and dress the area to take care of fluid build-up from overuse.

However, you should see your doctor if you experience severe pain, an obvious injury, or any of the following:

Rheumatoid Arthritis Stages And Progression

If you have a chronic condition such as arthritis or gout, you may not be able to get rid of the effusion forever. Fortunately, however, there are treatments that can help alleviate or prevent excess water in the knee if you deal with the problem regularly (more on that later).

In some cases, the fluid on the knee will disappear on its own. For example, if the cause of the effusion is temporary — such as an injury — the fluid should decrease after healing, according to the Cleveland Clinic. How long this takes depends on the severity of your injury.

But if you have the disease causing the effusion, you may not be able to completely eliminate your symptoms.

It can be difficult to determine whether your knee pain or swelling is due to an effusion or something else, as many knee problems cause similar symptoms.

Visuals Of Exercises To Help Relieve Knee Pain

According to the Cleveland Clinic, the best way to determine (and treat) the cause of your discomfort is to see your doctor.

The best treatment for an effusion depends on the cause. Here are some common solutions.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, one of the most important ways to reduce fluid in the knee joint is to rest — especially if the cause of the effusion is overuse or injury. This means ceasing activity and possibly even using a support such as a cane to walk.

Elevate your leg while resting to further reduce knee swelling, according to the Mayo Clinic. Elevating the knee above the level of the heart can help drain fluid from the joint.

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According to the Cleveland Clinic, applying cold or heat to your knee can help reduce pain and fluid buildup, especially if you have an injury or arthritis.

When using ice packs or freezer packs, do not place them directly on the skin – instead, wrap them in a towel before placing them on your knee.

What happens to your knee depends on the underlying cause of the effusion. But in general, resting the joint and not treating it likely won’t help it heal, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Whether your pain is caused by an injury, arthritis, or something else, it’s critical that you address the underlying problem to relieve your symptoms.

Rheumatoid Arthritis: These Ayurvedic Remedies Will Help Relieve Swelling, Pain

In some cases, a knee brace can help stabilize and heal your joint. For example, if you have an effusion from a ligament injury, a wrap may be helpful, according to a January 2022 StatPearls article.

However, before trying a brace or wrap, check with your doctor to make sure it’s the right approach to draining fluid from your knee.

Over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve) can also help relieve knee pain, especially if it’s the result of an injury or arthritis, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

If over-the-counter medications are ineffective, ask your doctor about prescription medications. If your knee effusion is due to rheumatoid arthritis or gout, your doctor may prescribe medications specific to those conditions, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Also, an effusion caused by septic arthritis or infection may require antibiotics.

Can Dieting Improve Lymphedema Symptoms?

So what is the best way to drain fluid from the knee? Through a needle inserted into the joint (a procedure called arthrocentesis), according to the Mayo Clinic. This can help reduce swelling and also help determine the cause of the effusion, as your doctor will likely send a sample of the fluid to a lab for analysis.

Short answer: No, it is not safe to try to drain the water from your knee yourself. That’s because using unsterilized or used needles can transmit infections, according to the FDA.

According to the Mayo Clinic, another possible method to get rid of fluid in the knee is physical therapy exercises. Your doctor may recommend this treatment if your effusion is the result of an injury and you need to regain strength and mobility in the area.

What exercises can you do for knee water? Well, it ultimately depends on the type of injury. Talk to your physical therapist about a customized set of knee exercises to reduce inflammation and fluid build-up.

Swelling Of The Knee After Exercise

Generally, no, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Rest is usually best when treating a joint effusion, so try to avoid overuse or weight bearing on the affected person.

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