How To Relieve Asthma Without An Inhaler

How To Relieve Asthma Without An Inhaler – Have you noticed that your asthma symptoms, such as wheezing, shortness of breath and chest tightness, get worse at night? You’re not alone: ​​Nighttime asthma symptoms are common, especially if you live with severe asthma. A Journal of Asthma study of nearly 14,000 people with asthma found that 60 percent of people with chronic asthma experienced nighttime asthma symptoms.

Below we will explain how to control asthma at night using a combination of asthma medications, a healthy lifestyle and good sleep hygiene.

How To Relieve Asthma Without An Inhaler

(You may need to reevaluate your overall asthma treatment plan with your doctor, including time of day, night.)

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If you have nocturnal asthma, you may experience the following symptoms while you sleep, and as a result, your sleep may be interrupted.

The presence of allergens such as dust mites and mold can trigger asthma symptoms, especially if you have allergy-induced asthma. Dust mites are small pests that cause allergies. They usually live in your pillows, blankets and mattresses, so it is common to be exposed to them at night. In some cases, nocturnal asthma may be a delayed response to exposure to allergens during the day.

Inhaling cold air from an air conditioner or external source can contribute to severe asthma symptoms at night. In addition, sleeping in a sitting position puts extra pressure on the chest and lungs, which can also contribute to asthma symptoms. Elevating your shoulders and neck with extra pillows or sleeping on your left side without a pillow between your legs can help you sleep more comfortably.

Your circadian rhythm—the natural 24-hour process that regulates your sleep cycles—affects the levels of nighttime hormones like adrenaline, which relaxes and widens your airways, and histamine, which constricts your airways. Nighttime fluctuations in these hormones can contribute to inflammation in your airways, causing nocturnal asthma symptoms. You may experience nighttime asthma symptoms when your epinephrine levels are too low and your histamine levels are high.

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If you have asthma and wake up several nights a week, talk to your doctor about additional treatment options after following your personal asthma treatment plan. They can evaluate your symptoms, identify possible causes, and suggest changes to your treatment plan if needed.

Common asthma medications can help control symptoms that are worse at night. Inhaled corticosteroids, such as Flovent® HFA and Qvar Redihaler®, are often prescribed to people with nighttime asthma symptoms that reduce swelling and inflammation in the airways, making them less likely to respond to asthma triggers.

Fast-acting bronchodilators such as albuterol (brand alternatives ProAir® HFA, Proventil® HFA, Ventolin® HFA) or levalbuterol (Xopenex HFA®) can be used at night to treat acute asthma symptoms. These inhalers relax the muscles around your airways to make breathing easier and are taken as needed to relieve symptoms immediately. Common side effects of bronchodilators are nervousness or tremors, headache, sore throat or nose, and muscle pain.

If you are concerned about the possible side effects of asthma medications, your doctor can explain more about the benefits and risks of taking corticosteroids or bronchodilators.

Ways To Stop An Asthma Attack Without An Inhaler

If allergens like dust mites contribute to your nighttime asthma, regularly washing your sheets, blankets and mattress protectors can help you avoid triggers. If possible, wash bedding in hot water as it helps remove dust. Also, maintain a comfortable temperature — 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit is a good range for many people with asthma — by making sure your room is well insulated and by closing windows to keep cold air out. Using a humidifier to add moisture to the air in your room can also help.

Better sleep hygiene does not replace asthma medication, but getting a good night’s sleep can reduce the negative effects of any sleep disturbances you experience at night with asthma.

If possible, avoid using electronic devices such as cell phones, tablets, and computers at least 30 minutes before bedtime. In addition to stimulating your brain, these devices also emit blue light, which affects your production of the sleep-regulating hormone melatonin.

Meditation and exercise before bed can help you fall asleep and stay asleep, but avoid vigorous exercise right before bed.

Why Is Asthma Worse At Night?

Create an environment that gets you ready for a good night’s sleep. In addition to maintaining a comfortable temperature, make sure your room is dark or dimly lit without distracting light from electronic devices. You may also consider sleeping with your dehumidifier on if you have one.

In addition to taking the above steps, if you think you may have a sleep disorder such as sleep apnea or insomnia, see your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

Here’s a step-by-step guide to make it easier to manage your asthma symptoms on any given day. Our team of pharmacists is on hand to answer questions about your asthma medications, and we offer free same-day delivery and medication management tools like reminders and automatic refills in our app.

Contact us anytime via secure message in the app or at 1-800-874-5881 to learn how to support your asthma management plan.

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This content is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always ask your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have about a medical condition.

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This article was written by Shawn Berger, MD. Dr. Shawn Berger is a board-certified pediatrician based in the San Diego, California metro area. Dr. Berger provides comprehensive primary care for infants, children and young people with a focus on preventive medicine. Dr. Berger received a BA in Psychology from the University of California San Diego and an MD from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Berger then completed his residency at UCSF/Fresno Community Medical Centers/Valley Children’s Hospital, where he was selected as chief resident. He has been awarded a UCSF Foundation Award and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

There are 19 references mentioned in this article which can be found at the bottom of the page.

Tips To Prevent Nighttime Asthma Attacks

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Being short of breath during an asthma attack can be a frightening experience, but there are things you can do to calm yourself and control your breathing. After the attack is over, consider how you can prevent or at least reduce future asthma attacks.

This article was written by Shawn Berger, MD. Dr. Shawn Berger is a board-certified pediatrician based in the San Diego, California metro area. Dr. Berger provides comprehensive primary care for infants, children and young people with a focus on preventive medicine. Dr. Berger received a BA in Psychology from the University of California San Diego and an MD from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Berger then completed his residency at UCSF/Fresno Community Medical Centers/Valley Children’s Hospital, where he was selected as chief resident. He has been awarded a UCSF Foundation Award and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. This article has been read 132,245 times.

The contents of this article are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, diagnosis or treatment. You should always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before starting, changing or stopping any form of health care.

Asthma Attack Without An Inhaler: 5 Things To Do Now

Having an asthma attack without breathing can be scary, but luckily there are a few ways you can help stop an attack. Sit in a chair with a straight back and loosen any tight clothing so you can breathe. If something stressful triggers your asthma, avoid the situation if you can. Take a deep, slow breath in through your nose and out through your mouth. If you have access to coffee or black tea, drink a cup to help you breathe a little better. Try to calm down and wait for 15 minutes. If your breathing still does not improve, call an ambulance. Read on for more tips from our medical co-author, including how to identify your common triggers. Breathing is something most people take for granted – except for those with severe asthma. Asthma narrows the airways in your lungs to the point where it becomes difficult to hold your breath.

Medicines such as inhaled corticosteroids and beta agonists open your airways to help you breathe more easily. But for some people with severe asthma, these medications may not be enough to control symptoms.

Until recently, doctors didn’t recommend breathing exercises for asthma simply because there wasn’t enough evidence that they worked. Much more

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